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Compare Costs Buy New Car vs. Used

Buying used can save you thousands upfront and over cycles of ownership, but buying new has other advantages.

While buying new cars is enticing, you should take a cold, hard look at how much you could save over time by buying used cars instead.

The average person owns 13 cars in a lifetime, each costing an average of $30,000, according to a report by the National Automobile Dealers Association. If each of those cars was 3 years old, instead of new, you could save nearly $130,000 during your lifetime.

The real money-saver in buying a used car is wrapped up in a sinister-sounding financial word: depreciation.

Car buying’s dirty little secret

Once you fully understand how car depreciation sucks money out of your wallet, you’ll learn how to save boatloads of cash over your lifetime. You often hear that a car loses 20% of its value as soon as you buy it. Yes, in just one minute, a $30,000 car will lose $6,000 as you gleefully drive off. By the end of the first year, mileage and wear and tear could bring that to 30%, or $9,000. Why don’t you feel this big hit? Because it takes effect much later, when you sell or trade in your car.

Take a look at two similar cars, one new and one used.

New-car depreciation: You buy the car for $30,000 and sell it three years later for $15,000. The car has cost you $15,000 in depreciation.

used-car depreciation: Now let’s say you buy the same car, but it's 3 years old when you buy it. You could buy the car for $15,000. Three years later you could sell it for $10,000. So the used car depreciation cost you only $5,000.

Now, if you’re paying attention, you would quickly say, “But driving a brand new car is much better!” You’re absolutely right. So, if driving a new car is worth an extra $10,000 to you, go for it. But don’t say we didn’t warn you.

Forget the old used-car stigmas

It used to be common for people to put down used cars by saying that it was just a way to buy someone else’s problems. That’s not true anymore. Here are two updates on old knocks against used cars of recent vintage.

Reliability: Cars have never been more dependable than they are today. It’s not uncommon for some cars to deliver more than 100,000 miles before needing major repairs.

Maintenance: All cars require regular maintenance such as oil changes, tire rotation, brake jobs. But you can drive today’s cars much farther in between these scheduled maintenance visits. Even tires and brake pads last much longer than before.

More used-car advantages

So it’s pretty clear that buying a used car is much cheaper and that cars in general are more dependable. But take a look at these other advantages:

Lower car insurance rates: When a vehicle is worth less, it costs less to insure it when you're buying collision and comprehensive coverage. You can also drop collision and comprehensive coverage, which pay for repairs to your car, and save even more.

Registry renewals are cheaper: The cost of registering a used car goes down every year.

Move up to a luxury car: Because you can save 30% or more, you can shop in a higher class of cars.

Less stress: Got a ding in the door? Who cares? But when it’s the first dent in your new car, it’s a huge bummer.

New-car advantages

While nearly everything about used cars costs less, buying a new car has its advantages.

New-car shopping is easier: All new cars are assumed to be perfect, so evaluating the condition isn’t a factor. No need to take it to a mechanic. Also, it’s easier to figure out what you should pay for a new car, even if the negotiation process is still a pain.

More used-car options: Automakers offer plenty of incentives to lure buyers, such as cash rebates. New car loans have better interest rates. This means you'll likely pay thousands of dollars less than the frightening sticker price once you negotiate a final price and apply the incentives.

Advanced technology: New features for comfort, performance and safety are introduced in new cars every year. You’ll need to wait several years to get them in used cars.

Peace of mind: A new car will likely be more reliable than a used one, even though pre-owned cars are much more dependable than in the past. If a new car breaks down, you can have it fixed for free under the included factory warranty, at least for the first 36,000 miles or three years that most carmakers offer.

Prestige: Let’s put it this way: You don’t hear many people bragging about the used car they just bought.

An exception to the rule

Not all cars depreciate at the same rate. Some brands are known for holding their value exceptionally well. When you add in possible new-car incentives and low-interest used-car, there are times when buying a new car doesn’t cost much more than buying a 1- or 2-year-old car.

You can find how much cars depreciate on several automotive websites, such as Kelley Blue Book’s 5-Year Cost to Own or Consumer Reports’ Cost of Vehicle Ownership.

What it means for you

Depreciation is a silent killer to your automotive budget. But by buying cars that hold their value, you can minimize the effects. If you’re still on the fence, use a car loan calculator to see how much less your monthly payment would be if you bought used instead of new.

Article Originally published on Nerdwallet.comBy Philip Reed

Fenton Fine Used Cars - Best Midsize Sedans

Please Read Fenton Fine Used Cars - Best Midsize Sedans

Content provided by MotorTrend

MotorTrend tests more than 200 vehicles at the track every year. We rate cars using the same factors you do, including how they drive, interior space, efficiency, tech, value, and safety. Ratings are only applicable within each respective segment.

  1. 2022 Honda Accord - 9.1/10 - After a midcycle refresh for 2021, we're not expecting any major changes to the Accord for 2022. Barring any significant revisions, it will carry forward with two gas engines and a hybrid option. The Accord competes with other affordable four-doors including the Hyundai Sonata, Toyota Camry, Kia K5, and Subaru Legacy.

  2. 2022 Subaru Legacy - 8.6/10 - Subaru knows its buyers and delivers on their priorities with the Legacy. The midsize sedan offers a compelling blend of technology, safety, and performance in a roomy and comfortable vessel. Middling style and a vexing CVT are the Legacy's greatest Achilles heels.

  3. 2022 Hyundai Sonata - 8.5/10 - Hyundai has been selling the Sonata here in the U.S. for more than 30 years, and the current eighth generation is the best version yet. Redesigned for the 2020 model year, the Hyundai Sonata is among the better midsize sedans on the market. It's mechanically related to the Kia K5.

  4. 2022 Kia K5 - 8.3/10 - The midsize sedan once known as the Kia Optima has transformed into the K5. Introduced for 2021, the K5 stands out in the segment with evocative exterior styling. Yet despite those looks it remains a relatively normal car in terms of features and capabilities. The K5 is offered with a choice of turbocharged engines and available AWD. Like the Optima before it, the K5 targets sedan stalwarts like the Honda Accord, Toyota Camry, and mechanically related Hyundai Sonata. The K5 is built in West Point, Georgia, alongside the Kia Telluride.

  5. 2022 Toyota Camry - 8/10 - Although it's no longer Toyota's best-selling model (that title now goes to the RAV4), the venerable Camry remains a go-to choice for those seeking a dependable midsize sedan. The current-gen Camry was introduced for the 2018 model year and sees a mild face-lift for 2021. The Camry sits squarely in the center of Toyota's lineup of sedans between the compact Corolla and full-size Avalon. Besides its longtime rival, the Honda Accord, the Camry also competes with midsize four-doors including the Subaru Legacy, Nissan Altima, and Hyundai Sonata.

  6. 2021 Nissan Altima - 7.7/10 - Positioned above the compact Sentra and below the full-size Maxima, the Altima is the middle child of Nissan's sedan lineup. Nissan issued a full redesign of the Altima for the 2019 model year, and the family sedan has been relatively unchanged since. The Altima competes in the midsize sedan segment alongside cars such as the Honda Accord, Hyundai Sonata, Toyota Camry, and Subaru Legacy.

  7. 2022 Volkswagen Passat - 7.1/10 - Once one of Volkswagen's most successful cars in the United States, the Passat enters its final year of production with a Limited Edition trim. It rides on the platform that's been on sale in the United States since 2012, the same year it won our MotorTrend Car of the Year award. The Passat last received a major refresh in 2020. Although this midsize sedan no longer feels like a fresh offering, it comes with the traditional advantages of its segment, namely a comfortable ride, a large trunk, and spacious interior.

  8. 2021 Chevrolet Malibu - One of the longest-running nameplates in the Chevrolet lineup, the Malibu has been a mainstay in the midsize sedan segment for decades. Since its inception, the Malibu has evolved from a rear-drive car that's available in multiple flavors to a front-drive model offered only one body style. Chevrolet even offered a hybrid Malibu for a short time to lure eco-minded consumers to the brand. With only a short time left before it's discontinued, the Malibu lineup has been streamlined. A number of cosmetic packages are also offered.

  9. 2021 Mazda Mazda6 - As we wait for the rumored RWD, inline-six-powered, next-gen 6, Mazda adds some polish to its midsize sedan for 2021. The current-generation model debuted for the 2014 model year and saw a mid-cycle facelift for 2018, adding a turbocharged engine option. The 2021 Mazda 6 competes with other affordable midsize sedans including the Honda Accord, Toyota Camry, and Hyundai Sonata.

Original Source: https://www.motortrend.com/style/sedan/

Best New Sedans of 2021

Read Fenton Fine Cars "Best New Sedans of 2021"
Content provided by: CarAndDriver.com
Hyundai Accent
With a starting price around $16,000, the 2021 Hyundai Accent is one of the least expensive new vehicles today, but Hyundai doesn't make any of its three trims a penalty box. All three are powered by an unexciting-but-efficient 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine bolted to either a six-speed manual or a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT). All Accents come with features that only a few years ago would be considered luxuries in the subcompact car segment, including power windows, air conditioning, and a six-way adjustable driver's seat. Moving up to the SEL and Limited trims adds even more modern-day luxuries such as a larger 7.0-inch infotainment touchscreen, heated seats, and push-button start. Best of all, the Accent will never make you feel—or look–cheap thanks to grown-up styling and a no-fuss interior.

Kia Rio
The 2021 Kia Rio sedan and hatchback are classified as economical subcompact cars—we used to call such cars "econoboxes"—but they're surprisingly more sophisticated than that. The Kia couple share a cabin design that exudes an elegant simplicity thanks to a smart layout and pleasing materials. On the flip side, both of the Rios' back seats suffer from limited passenger space and neither body style has a particularly accommodating cargo area or trunk. Still, we appreciate that they're one of the few subcompact cars to offer standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. We're even willing to forgive their dearth of common driver assists, because the Chevy Spark and Nissan Versa are the only rivals that offer more advanced safety features. The 2021 Rios shine with their refined ride quality and composed handling, which help squash any stereotypes about cheap transportation.

Hyundai Elantra
Hyundai is becoming increasingly known for daring designs, and the company's compact sedan, the 2021 Elantra, is the latest to receive a bold new look. The new Elantra sports angular exterior details and an upscale cabin, both of which are intended to pull focus away from the segment's heavy hitters—namely the Honda Civic, Toyota Corolla, and Nissan Sentra. The standard powertrain is a 147-hp four-cylinder but Hyundai also offers a 201-hp turbocharged N Line model and an available hybrid powertrain. A host of driver-assistance features are standard, with even more advanced tech offered as options.

Honda Civic
Once mere basic transportation, the humble Honda Civic has blossomed into a desirable and fun-to-drive compact car. Available as either a sedan or a practical hatchback, the Civic is powered by your choice of a 158-hp 2.0-liter four-cylinder or a turbocharged 1.5-liter that makes 174 or 180 horsepower, depending on the model. Honda loads up its smallest car with plenty of standard driver-assistance features, including automated emergency braking, adaptive cruise control, and lane-keeping assist. Oddly, modern infotainment features aren't standard; the base LX model comes with a tiny touchscreen that offers radio tuning and not much else. The base model notwithstanding, the Civic is a compact car that should satisfy most buyers and one we're happy to recommend. If you're seeking something with a spicier flavor, we'd suggest the 306-hp Civic Type R (both reviewed separately).

Mazda 3
If a 2021 Mazda 3 shows up when you call your next Uber, we'd forgive you for confusing it with a far more expensive Audi or BMW as you settle into the passenger's seat. Mazda often straddles the line between mainstream and luxury, and it pays off in its bread-and-butter hatchback, particularly in the swanky Premium and Premium Plus trims. A trio of four-cylinder engines are on the menu, as is all-wheel drive. The 3 continues to be one of the most refined and athletic compact cars on sale today, with high-tech infotainment and driver-assistance features that provide a class-above experience. That said, adding those features may drive the 3's price beyond what buyers in this segment are willing to pay, giving mainstream stalwarts like the Toyota Corolla and Honda Civic an edge.

Volkswagen Jetta GLI
The 2021 Volkswagen Jetta GLI has the same amazing driving attributes that make the Golf GTI a smash hit. Although the hatchback has a nicer interior, it's actually the sedan that's more practical, thanks to its roomier back seat and bigger trunk. Both VW's boast a potent 228-hp turbocharged four-cylinder that mates to either an engaging manual transmission or a quicker-shifting automatic. The sedan's aesthetic is more sedated than its hot-hatch sibling, but at least it sells at a discounted price, as the GLI costs thousands less than the GTI. Still, these two Vee-Dubs are equally entertaining whether they're looping racetracks or racing down back roads—which made it an easy choice for our 2021 10Best list. Simply put, the 2021 Jetta GLI is compact-sedan greatness.

Honda Accord
In the shrinking segment of family sedans there are still some great cars to choose from, but one stands above the rest for its impeccable driving dynamics, practical interior, and value: the 2021 Honda Accord. So impressed are we with the Accord that it's become a nearly permanent fixture on our annual 10Best list and it finds itself there again for 2021. Buyers can choose from two turbocharged four-cylinder powertrains; there's also a fuel-sipping hybrid model available. No matter what engine powers the Accord, its handling is effortlessly balanced, which makes navigating twisty roads a joy and long highway journeys a pleasure. The Accord boasts a spacious trunk that will make grocery runs a snap and a back seat is commodious enough for two adults for long road trips. The roomy interior also easily accommodates multiple child seats for growing families.

Hyundai Sonata
The 2021 Hyundai Sonata is a really good way to get attention while driving a family sedan. Its dramatic styling includes exaggerated proportions, a prominent grille, and a quirky design cue featuring a spear of bright trim that flows along the front fenders and into the headlights to create what designers call a "lighting signature." Inside, the Sonata flaunts a sophisticated, attractive space loaded with upscale features and plenty of passenger room. While the Sonata isn't quick or engaging to drive, it has a trio of efficient powertrains, including a hybrid option that has higher government fuel-economy ratings than the Toyota Camry hybrid. Still, the Hyundai is less about numbers and more about value, thanks to its affordable pricing and an impressive amount of content.

Mazda 6
The 2021 Mazda 6 isn't just the prettiest family sedan, it's also more enjoyable to drive and ride in than most of its peers. While the Mazda isn't as flawless as the Honda Accord or as fresh as the Hyundai Sonata, it definitely delivers a more expensive-feeling experience than either of those top-flight alternatives. Neither its 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine or the more potent turbo version are particularly compelling, and there's currently no eco-friendly hybrid model, but the 6 drives with a mix of athleticism and refinement that broadens its appeal. We wish Mazda would make the car's fanciest features available across the board, but even the lower end of the lineup has a host of standard driver assists and popular technology. Although the 2021 Mazda 6 isn't perfect, it's one of the classiest entries in this class of family-oriented four-doors.

Kia K5
Even with the dwindling desirability of family sedans, Kia has crafted a compelling example with the all-new 2021 K5. Its daring design evokes sportiness and luxuriousness, and the sleek-looking four-door is a legitimate head-turner. The cabin is elegantly appointed and brimming with high-tech content, such as a digital gauge cluster and cool ambient lighting. While the K5 isn't particularly entertaining to drive, its powertrain and ride provide a refined experience. The 290-hp GT model comes with performance equipment that should give it a more entertaining attitude. A spacious back seat and generous trunk also make it a useful alternative to popular crossover SUVs, especially with its optional all-wheel-drive system. The death of the mid-size sedan may be imminent, but the 2021 K5 aims to be one of the best left.

Mercedes-Benz A-Class
Distilling a luxury brand's ethos down to a small and affordable entry-level sedan is a tough task wrought with compromise, but the 2021 Mercedes-Benz A-class delivers a sophistication similar to its more expensive stablemates. Mercedes equips all A-class models with a host of luxury amenities and offers even more as optional extras. A turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine is standard and delivers adequate power but easily fades into the background for quiet highway cruising. Tech features abound as well, including a version of Mercedes's dual-screen infotainment/digital gauge display setup with the MBUX infotainment interface. Going up against other compact luxury sedans such as the Cadillac CT4 and the BMW 2-series Gran Coupe puts an even finer point on the Mercedes's luxury experience.


Original Source: BY ERIC STAFFORD AND DREW DORIAN - FEB 19, 2021 - https://www.caranddriver.com/features/g27227136/best-sedans/

TRUCK PAYLOAD VS. TOWING CAPACITY WHAT YOU NEED T

Think payload and towing capacity mean the same thing? Think again. One is all about carry, the other all about pull. Learn the key differences between these often misunderstood truck terms so you don’t risk harming your truck or your cargo. It’s time to talk truck stuff.

Carry or Pull?

The main difference between payload and towing capacity is fairly simple.

Payload refers to the number of pounds of cargo a pickup truck can carry, and towing refers to the number of pounds a pickup truck can pull

Payload Capacity: How Much Your Truck Can Carry

Your truck’s payload capacity refers to all the cargo weight that you can safely add in addition to your truck’s empty weight (also known as curb weight). A “payload” could be anything from a truck bed full of garden mulch to five passengers and a week’s worth of luggage.

Payload capacity is calculated by your vehicle manufacturer and noted in the owner’s manual. But you can calculate your truck’s payload capacity on your own by doing a little math:

Start with the maximum total weight your truck can handle, known as its Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR). GVWR is also determined by the manufacturer and is listed in your owner’s manual. Subtract your truck’s curb weight from its GVWR—that’s your payload capacity!


Payload Capacity = Gross Vehicle Weight – Curb Weight

For example, if your truck’s GVWR is 9,000 lbs and it weighs 5,000 lbs empty, then your payload capacity is 4,000 lbs. You can put 4,000 lbs of people and stuff in your truck.

Note: Payload capacity includes passengers! If you’re picking up a couple of friends, you may need to drop cargo to stay within your truck’s weight limit.

Note: Payload capacity includes passengers! If you’re picking up a couple of friends, you may need to drop cargo to stay within your truck’s weight limit.

  • One-quarter cord of firewood (1,250 lbs)
  • One-half cubic yard of sand (1,300 to 1,500 lbs)
  • One-half cubic yard of gravel (1,200 to 1,450 lbs)
  • One-half cubic yard of mulch (300 to 400 lbs)
  • One-half cubic yard of dirt (1,000 lbs)

Towing Capacity: How Much Your Truck Can Pull

Towing capacity refers to how much weight you can safely pull behind your truck with a trailer. Typically, your truck’s towing capacity far exceeds its payload capacity because the majority of the weight is resting on the trailer axles, not your truck’s axles.

You can find your truck’s towing capacity in the owner’s manual or calculate it on your own. To find your truck’s towing capacity, subtract your truck’s curb weight from its Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating (GCVWR). The GCVWR is the maximum weight of your loaded truck and the weight of its attached trailer.

Towing Capacity = Gross Combined Vehicle Weight – Curb Weight

Let’s say your truck has a GCVWR of 15,000 lbs. It weighs 5,000 lbs empty and you already have 4,000 lbs of dirt in the truck bed. Your towing capacity would be no more than 6,000 lbs.

Here are some items you might tow, along with their common weights:

  • Car (2,800 lbs)
  • Car trailer (1,600 to 2,000 lbs)
  • Motorboat (2,500 lbs)
  • Boat trailer (300 to 1,500 lbs)
  • Camper (5,200 lbs)

Payload vs. Towing Capacity Example: 2018 Chevy Silverado

The payload capacity of a 2018 Chevy Silverado truck ranges from 1,739 to 2,018 lbs. Remember, this amount refers to how much weight you can add without a trailer.

As for towing capacity, a 2018 Chevy Silverado can tow anywhere from 7,600 to 23,000 lbs, depending on how the truck is configured, notes Chevy.

If all these numbers have you “tow” excited, read on! When equipped with an EcoTec3 5.3L V8, the 2018 Chevy Silverado 1500 pickup can safely tow up to 9,800 lbs.

Meanwhile, the towing capacity of the 2018 Chevy Silverado 2500HD is 14,500 lbs. And the Chevy Silverado 3500HD Duramax® 6.6L Turbo-Diesel V8? It can tow up to 20,000 lbs—almost two adult elephants!

Even Chevy’s smaller pickup model, the 2018 Chevy Colorado, can tow up to 7,700 lbs if equipped with a Duramax®2 2.8L Turbo-Diesel engine.

Know Before You Tow!

Ignoring your truck’s towing and payload capacity is one of the easiest ways to damage its frame, engine, transmission, and tires. Consult your owner’s manual before pushing, pulling, or hauling any load.

Proper hauling, based in part on the stability of your cargo, can also prevent crashes. A study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety found that from 2011 to 2014 in the U.S., road debris—including improperly loaded cargo—was a factor in an estimated average of 50,658 crashes per year, causing 9,805 injuries and 125 deaths.

This article was originally published firestonecompleteautocare.com on January 7th, 2019

Diesel Trucks Vs Gas Trucks

Unfortunately, determining whether a gas or diesel truck is right for you is not a cut and dry question. Each comes with it’s own advantages and drawbacks. Here’s a look at some of the most common areas you may be considering and which engine is better suited towards each.

COST TO BUY

 
Winner – Gasoline

Gas trucks are typically $5000-$8000 cheaper than diesel trucks for class 3 and 4 trucks. Diesel trucks make more sense for those driving a lot of miles each year. This number is often set around 30,000 miles annual. Above this number and a diesel truck may be more cost effective for you.

COST PER GALLON OF FUEL

 
Winner – Gasoline

As of 2011, the previous 14 years saw the average price of gasoline nearly 14 cents lower than diesel fuel.

FUEL EFFICIENCY

 
Winner – Diesel

The US Dept of Energy states that diesel engines can be 30-35% more fuel efficient than their gasoline counterparts. Diesel fuel has a higher density of “energy” within the fuel itself which means that less fuel is needed to generate the same power as a gasoline engine.

MAINTENANCE COST

 
Winner – Gasoline

Typically, diesel engines cost more to maintain than gas motors. This can be attributed to the extra components on a diesel engine that are not found on gas engines, as well as the need to change filters more frequently. Diesel motors also tend to have a higher oil capacity meaning more is needed during each oil change.

ENGINE LIFE

 
Winner – Diesel

Diesel motors are designed to last many more miles than a gasoline motor. It’s not uncommon to see diesel trucks still on the road with 500,000 miles or more, whereas the design life of a gasoline motor is closer to the 200k range.


TOWING CAPACITY

 
Winner – Diesel

Diesel trucks are the clear winner in terms of towing. It’s not that gasoline motors can’t tow or haul as much of a payload, but diesel engines just do it better. Since diesel motors generate all it’s power and torque at low RPMs, this give the diesel an advantage at pulling heavy loads especially up steep grades. Also, if you plan on repeatedly towing heavy loads with a gasoline engine, it may reduce engine life.

RESALE VALUE

 
Winner – Diesel

Since a diesel truck often last twice as many miles or more as a gas engine, a diesel truck with 200k miles will command a much higher price than a gas truck with the same number of miles. After all, the diesel truck has plenty of life remaining while the gasoline engine is nearing the end of its expected lifespan. For that reason, buying will pay more for a used diesel truck than a gas truck with comparable miles.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

 
Winner – Similar, no winner

Diesel trucks used to pollute the air more than gas trucks, but the two are pretty even these days. Recent regulations by the EPA have made this much less of an issue today. For new trucks that meet the latest emissions standards, neither has a clear advantage.

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